Lactating Mothers

23 04 2015

Lactating Mothers

A newborn baby has only three demands: The warmth in the arms of its mother, food from her breast and security in the knowledge of her presence. Breastfeeding satisfies all the three.

Breast milk is the natural and complete food for infants. It is safe, inexpensive and provides all nutrients most babies need for the first 6 months of life. Breast milk contains several anti-infective factors such as bile salt stimulated lipase, lactoferrin and immunoglobulin. Breast milk protects against microorganisms. Demonstrations prove that the IQ averaging 7 points higher if they are breastfed.Researches have shown that breastfed babies have less chance of developing diabetes mellitus type 1.are less like to suffer from eczema, food allergy, respiratory and intestinal infections than formula-fed babies. Most mothers after initiating expression of breast milk on the first few days postpartum complain of insufficient volume of breast milk. This has prompted mothers to shift their children to bottle feeding and stop breast feeding.

The term given an herb or food that increases the flow or production of breast milk is galactogogue. Moringa act as galactogogues and increases the flow or production of breast milk. The use of Moringa by the mother would create the ultimate breast milk made even more nutritious by the vast array of vital nutrients naturally available to the mother. It provides the primary source of nutrition for newborns before they are able to eat and digest other foods. We all know instinctively that breast milk is the ultimate food prescribed by nature for the infant child and Moringa can be instrumental in helping mothers produce more of this precious food. To put it simply, if the mother is granted better health by ingesting the adequate amount of Moringa ,all of her healthy benefits are passed on to the baby for a future of better health. The Moringa Leaves are incomparable source of the sulphur-containing amino acids methionine and cystine, which are often in short supply.

Good nutrition before pregnancy is important because of the amount of “resources” childbirth requires. The process of pre-pregnancy nutrition is a process of “building up” the immune system in preparation of pregnancy, and is known as being one of the major factors in determining the success rate of conceiving healthy children. Moringa products have been used to combat malnutrition, especially among infants and nursing mothers. Pregnant women need more iron to make more hemoglobin for all that additional blood. They also need extra iron for their growing baby and placenta.

Having a well balanced diet during pregnancy is extremely important, as the diet is going to be directly related to the health of the fetus.

Thus, Moringa supplementation is essential to get the right amounts of vitamins and minerals, as well as other nutrients.

The natural constituents of Moringa leaves and fruit pods are nature’s answer to helping mothers produce copious amounts of highly nutritious milk for their infants. It’s very important for the newborn to get vital nutrients such as good fats (DHA and EPA) for brain development, immune system protectors, digestible protein, the amino acids argenine and histidine plus many others as soon as possible to start the process of total body development. Moringa leaf boosts your energy in a natural manner, and is a remarkable source of nutrition. This energy promotion does not happen because of sugar, so it is lasts for a long time. Mothers who took Moringa during pregnancy have experienced being able to produce milk much quicker after delivery verses those mothers who didn’t.

[reposted from http://organic-moringa.com/moringa-benefits/lacating-mothers/]

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Moringa use while Breastfeeding

22 03 2014

Moringa Levels and Effects while Breastfeeding

[reposted]

Summary of Use during Lactation

Moringa (Moringa oleifera) leaves contain vitamins, minerals, and essential amino acids as well as a number of glycosides. It is used as a galactogogue in Asia,[1] particularly in the Philippines where it is called malunggay. Two small studies from the Philippines indicate that it might have some activity as a galactogogue in mothers of preterm infants.[2][3] Galactogogues should never replace evaluation and counseling on modifiable factors that affect milk production.[4] Moringa oleifera leaves are widely used as a food and medicine in Asia and Africa and one small study found no adverse effects in nursing mothers who ingested moringa leaves.[2] No data exist on the safety of Moringa in nursing infants.

Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the US Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to prove the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does not certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information about dietary supplements is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.

Drug Levels

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in Breastfed Infants

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible Effects on Lactation

Mothers who delivered an infant before week 37 of gestation were randomized to receive commercial capsules containing Moringa oleifera leaves 250 mg (n = 31) or identical placebo capsules containing flour (n = 37) twice daily from day 3 postpartum. Mothers were given instruction on using a breast pump, then pumped their breasts every 4 hours and recorded the volume of milk produced from days 3 to 5. At baseline, control mothers collected a much lower volume of milk than mothers in the treatment group. (87 vs 114 mL). Mothers in the treatment group had a greater increase in milk volume on day 4 (67% vs 42%) and day 5 (180% vs 38%) than mothers in the placebo group. Milk volumes on day 5 were 320 mL in the treatment group and 120 mL in the control group.[2] Although well designed, problems with this study include the small number of patients, the large difference in milk volumes at baseline, a high dropout rate in each group, and lack of intent-to-treat analysis.

A study presented in abstract form only studied 40 mothers with infants less than 37 weeks of gestation and producing less than 100 mL of milk on day 2 postpartum. Mothers were randomized to receive unspecified doses of domperidone, metoclopramide, Moringa oliefera leaves (dosage form not stated), or placebo. Mothers used a breast pump to collect milk at unspecified intervals and serum prolactin was measured on days 3, 7 and 14 postpartum. Baseline milk production was equivalent among the groups. On days 7 and 14, milk volume in all of the treatment groups was greater than in the placebo group. The highest volume was in the domperidone group, followed by metoclopramide, and Moringa oliefera. No correlation was found between serum prolactin and milk volume.[3]

References

1. Mollik AH. Plants from Sundarbans to the diet of lactating mothers during puerperium of Barguna district of Bangladesh. Pediatr Nephrol. 2010;25:1904. Abstract #298. DOI:doi:10.1007/s00467-010-1577-z

2. Estrella MC, Mantaring JB, David GZ, Taup MA. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial on the use of malunggay (Moringa oleifera) for augmentation of the volume of breastmilk among non-nursing mothers of preterm infants. Philipp J Pediatr. 2000;49:3-6.

3. Co MM, Hernandez EA, Co BG. A comparative study on the efficacy of the different galactogogues among mothers with lactational insufficiency. Presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding. 2002;NCE. Abstract.

4. The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine Protocol Committee. ABM clinical protocol #9: use of galactogogues in initiating or augmenting the rate of maternal milk secretion (First revision January 2011). Breastfeed Med. 2011;6:41-9. PMID: 21332371

Moringa Identification

Substance Name

Moringa

Scientific Name

Moringa oleifera

Drug Class

  • Complementary Therapies
  • Food
  • Galactogogues
  • Phytotherapy
  • Plants, Medicinal

Administrative Information

LactMed Record Number

979

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s LactMed Database.

Last Revision Date

2013-09-07

Disclaimer

Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.








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